Kannada, Kannadiga, Kannadigaru, Karnataka,

Kannadigarella ondaagi Kannadavannu ulisona, kalisona and belesona

History of Karnataka

History of Karnataka

History of Karnataka – written in Kannada- RECENTLY WRITTEN
http://picasaweb.google.com/vmkumaraswamy/HistoryOfKarnataka?authkey=D0hjseNSVwk

A Pre-historic Brief:
The pre-historic culture of Karnataka, the hand-axe culture, compares favourable with the one that existed in Africa and is quite distinct from the pre-historic culture of North India. The early inhabitants of Karnataka knew the use of iron far earlier than the North, and iron weapons, dating back to 1200 B.C have found at Hallur in Dhaward district.Early rulers:
The early rulers of Karnataka were predominantly from North India. Parts of Karnataka were subject to the rule of the Nandas and the Mauryas.

The Shathavahanas (30 B.C to 230 A.D of paithan) ruled over extensive areas in Northern Karnataka. Karnataka fell into the hands of the Pallavas of Kanchi. Pallavas domination was ended by indigenous dynasties, the Kadambas of Banavasi and the Gangas of Kolar, who divided Karnataka between themselves.

The Kadambas

The Kadamba Dynasty was founded by Mayurasharman in c. 345 A.D. Subjected to some kind of humiliation at the Pallava capital, this young brahmin gave up his hereditary priestly vacation and took to the life of a warrior and revolted aganist the Pallavas. The Pallavas were forced to recognise him as a sovereign when he crowned himself at Banavasi in Uttar Kannada Dt. One of his successors, Kakustha Varman (c. 435-55) was such a powerful ruler that even the Vakatakas and the guptas cultivated martial relationship with this family during his time. The great poet Kalidasa deems to have visited his court.

The Gangas

The Gangas started their rule from c. 350 from Kolara and later their capital was shifted to Talakadu (Mysore Dt.). Till the advent of the Badami Chalukyas, they were almost a sovereign power. Later they continued to rule ove Gangavadi (which comprised major parts of South Karnataka) till the close of the 10th century as subordinates of the Badami Chalukyas and the Rastrakutas.

The Badami Chalukyas

It is the Chalukyas of Badami who brought the whole of Karnataka under a single rule. They are also remembered for their contributions in the feild of art. Their monuments are found at Badami, Aihole and Pattadakal. The first great prince of the dynasty was Pulikeshin I (c. 540-66 A.D) who built the ashwamedha (horse sacrifice) after subduing many rulers including the Kadambas.

His grandson, Pulikeshin II (609-42) built a vast empire which extended from Narmada in the north to the Cauveri in the south. In the east, he overthrew the Vishnukundins and appointed his younger brother Vishnuvardhana, the voceroy of Vengi.

The Chalukyan empire included not only the whole of karnataka and Maharashtra, but the greater part of Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh and Andra, and also parts of Orissa and Tamilnadu. Vikramaditya II (693-734) in the line defeated the Pallavas, entered the Pallava capital Kanchi victorious. The Chalukyan power was weakened in the long run by its wars with the Pallavas.

The Rastrakutas

In 753, Danthidurga, the Rastrakuta feudatory of the Chalukyas, overthrew the Chalukya king Keerthivarman II, and his family inherited the fortunes of the Chalukyas. The engraving of the celebrated monolithic Kailas temple at Ellora (now in Maharshtra) is attribuited to Danthidurga’s uncle, Krishna I (756-74). Krishna’s son, Dhruva (780-93) crossed the Narmada, and after defeating celebrated princes like Vathsaraja (of the Gurjara Pratheehara family of central India) and Dharmapala of Bengal, extracted tribute from the ruler of Kanauji, ‘the seat of India’s paramountry’. His son Givinda III (793-814) also repeated the feast when he defeated Nagabhata II, the Gujara Pratheehara and Dharmapala of Bengal and again extracted tribute from the King of Kanauj.The achievements of the Chalukyas of Badami and the Rastrakutas by defeating the rulers of Kanauj have made their erathe “Age of Imperial Karnataka”.

The Kalyana Chalukyas

The Chalukyas of Kalyana overthrew the Rastrakutas in 973, Someshwara I (10432068), succeeded in resisting the efforts of the Cholas to subdue Karnataka, and he built a new capital, Kalyana (mordern Basava Kaluyana in Bidar Dt.) The Chola king Rajadhiraja was killed by him at Koppar in 1054.

His son Vikramaditya VI (10762127) has been celebrated in history as the patron of the great jurist Vijnaneshwara, (work: mitakshara, standard work on Hindu law), and the emperor has been immortalised by poet Dilhana (haling from Kashmir) who chose this prince himself as the hero for his sanskrit poem, Vikramankadeva Charitam. Vikramaditya defeated the Paramaras of Centeral India thrice. In the South he captured Kanchi from the Cholas in 1085, and in the East, he conqured Vengi in 1093. His commander, Mahadeva built the Mahadeva temple at Itagi (Raichur Dt.) the finest Chalukyan monument. His son Someshwara III (1127-39) was a great scholar. He has written Manasollasa, a sanskrit encyclopedia and Vikrmankabhyudayam, a peom of which his father is the hero,

The Sevunas

The Sevunas (or Yadavas) who were foundatories of the Rastrakutas and the chalukyas of Kalyana, became a sovereign power from the days of Bhillama V (1173-92) who founded the new capital Devagiri (modern Daulathabad in Maharastra). Bhillama V captured Kalyana in 1186, and later clashed with Hoysala Ballala II at Sorarturu in 1190. Though he lost the battle.He built a vast kingdom, extending from the Narmada to the Krishna. His son Jaitugi (1192-99) not only defeated Parmara Subhata varma, but also killed the Kakatiya kings of Orangal, Rudra and Mahadeva.

Singhana II (11992247), the greatest of the Sevunas, extended the Sevuna kingdom upto the Tungabhadra. But the Servunas were defeated by the army of the Delhi Sultan in 1296, and again in 1307 and finally in 1318, and thus the kingdom was wiped out. The Sevunas have become in immortal in history by the writings of the mathematician Baskarasharya, of the great writer on music, Sharngadeva, and of the celebrated scholar Hemadri.

The Hoysalas

The Hoyasala continued the great traditions of their art-loving overlords the Kalyana Chalukyas, and their fine temples are found at Beluru, Helebidu and Somanathapura. Vishnuvardhana (11082141) freed Gangavadi from the Cholas (who had held it from 999), and in commemoration of his victory, built the celebrated Vijayanarayana (Chennakeshva) Temple at Belur.

His commander Katamalla built the famous Hoysaleshwara temple at Halebidu.

Though Vishnuvardhana did not succeed in his serious effort to overthrow the Chalukyan yoke, his grandson Balla II (11732220) not only became free, but even defeated Sevuna Bhillama V at Soraturu in 1190, after having defeated Chalukyas Someshwara IV in 1187. When the Cholas were attacted by the Pandyas in Tamilnadu, Balla II drove the Pandyas back and thus assumed the title “Establisher of the Chola Kingdom”. Later, in the days of his son Narasimha II (1120-35), Hoysalas even secured a foothold in Tamilnadu and Kuppam, near Srirangam became a second capital of the Hoysalas.

Ballala III (12912343), the last Hoysala, had to struggle hard to hold his own against the invasion of the Delhi Sultan. He died fighting the Sultan of Madhurai. It was his commanders, Harihara and Bukka, who founded the Vijayanagra Kingdom, which later grew to be an empire. Hoyasala age saw great kannada poets like Rudrabhatta, Janna, Harihara and Raghavanka. Hoysala temples at Beluru, Halebidu, Somanathapur, Arasikere, Amritapura etc., are wonderful works of art.

Vijayanagara Empire

When the armies of the Delhi Sultanate destroyed the four great kingdom of the south (the Sevunas, Kakatiyas of Orangal, Hoysalas and of the Pandyas of Madhurai) it looked as if a political power following a religion quite alien to the South was going to dominate the peninsula. Many princes including heroic Kumara Rama, a fudatory from Kamapila in Bellary dist. perished while resisting the onslaughts. When the Vijayanagara Kingdom was founded by the Sangama brothers, people wholeheartedly supported them. Tradition says that sage Vidyaranya had caused a shower of gold to finance the Sangama brothers. Perphaps the sage succeeded in securing financial help from various quarters for the founders of Vijayanagara . Harisha founded the kingdom in about 1336, and he secured control over northern parts of Karnataka and Andhra iron coasts. After the death of Ballala III (1343) and his son Virupaksha Ballala (in 1346), the whole of the Hoysala dominion came under his control. His brother Bukka (1356-77) succeeded in destroying the Madhurai Sultanate. It is this prince who sponsored the writing of the monumental commentary on the vedas: Vedarthaprakasha; the work was completed in the days of his son Harihara II (13772404)

Krishnadevaraya (15092529) was the greatest emperor during his time. He was also a great warrior, scholar and administrator. He secured Raichur Doab in 1512, and later marched victorious into the capitals of his enemies like Bidar (1512) Bijapur (1523) and in the East, Cuttack (1518), the capital of the Gajapatis. His rule saw the reign of peace and prosperity.

In the days of Aravidu Ramaraya (1542-65), Krishnadevaraya’s son-in-law, the four Shashi Sultans attacked the empire, and after killing Ramarya at Rallasathangadi (Rakkasagi-Tangadagi) in 1565, destroyed the capital Vijayanagara.

The Last Rulers:
With the weakening of the Mughul power in the North, the Marathas came to have control over the northern districts of Karnataka. Haidar Ali, Who used power from the Wodeyars of Mysore, merged the Keladi Kingdom in Mysore in 1763. Karnataka came under British rule after the overthrow of Tipu, Haidar’s son in 1799 and the Marathas in 1818 (When the Peshwa was defeated). After having been subjected to a number of administrations during the British rule, Karnataka became a single state in 1956.

TIME LINE of KARNATAKA STATE

First created: 18 Aug 1998
Last updated : June 17,2007

Period Dynasty Important Kings
Pre-historic  
Early years Satavahanas Seemukha
Gowtamiputra
325 A.D.- 540 A.D. Kadambas of Banavasi Mayurasharma
Kakusthaverrma
325 A.D.- 999 A.D. Gangas of Talkad Avinita
Durvinita
Rachamalla
500 A.D. – 757 A.D. Chalukyas of Badami Mangalesha
Pulakeshi II
757 A.D. – 973 A.D. Rashrakootas Krishna I
Govinda III
Nripatunga I
973 A.D. – 1198 A.D. Chalukyas of Kalyan Vikramaditya VI
1198 A.D. – 1312 A.D. Yadavas of Devagiri Singahana II
1000 A.D. – 1346 A.D. Hoysalas Vishnuvardhana
Ballala II
1336 A.D. – 1565 A.D. Vijayanagar Kings Devaraya II
Krishnadevaraya
1347 A.D. – 1527 A.D. Bahamani Kings Mohammed Shah I
Modammed Shah II
1490 A.D. – 1686 A.D. Sultans of Bijapur Yusuf Adil Khan
Ibrahim Adil Shah II
1500 A.D. – 1763 A.D. Nayakas of Keladi Shivappa Nayaka
Queen Chennamma
1399 A.D. – 1761 A.D. Wodeyars of Mysore Ranadheera Kanthirava
Chikkadevaraja
1761 A.D. – 1799 A.D. Hyder Ali and Tippu Sultan Hyder Ali
Tipu Sultan
1800 A.D. Division of Karnataka: But for old Mysore, Karnataka was share among the Bombay and Madras presidencies belonging to the British, The Marathas and the Nizam of Hyderabad.
1800 A.D. – 1831 A.D. Wodeyars of Mysore Krishnaraj Wodeyar III
1831 A.D. – 1881 A.D. British Empire British Commissioners
1881 A.D. – 1950 A.D. Wodeyars of Mysore Krishnaraj Wodeyar IV
Jayachamarajendra Wodeyar
1956 Present day Karnataka is formed.

History of Karnataka

History of Karnataka

Hoysaleshwara Temple, Karnataka Travel AgentsKarnataka, called as Karunadu (elevated land) in ancient times. The course of Karnataka’s history and culture takes us back to pre-historic times. The earliest find of the stone age period in India was a hand axe at Lingasugur in Raichur district. The Ashoka’s rock edicts found in the state indicate that major parts of Northern Karnataka were under the Mauryas. Chandragupta Maurya, the great Indian emperor abdicated the throne and embraced Jainism at Shravanabelagola. Adding new dimensions to the cultural and spiritual ethos of the land, many great dynasties left their imprint upon the aesthetic development of Karnataka’s art forms. Prominent among them were the Chalukyas, the Hoysalas and the mighty Vijayanagara Empire. The Chalukyan’s built some of the very early Hindu temples in India. Aihole turned up as an experimental base for the dynamic creations of architects. The Hoysala’s who ruled from the 11th to the 13th century chiseled their way into the pages of glory by building more than 150 temples, each one is a master piece in its own way. The amazing dexterity and fluidity of expressions at Somnathpur, Halebid and Belur open themselves to the wide eyed wonder in one’s eyes. Vijayanagara, the greatest of all medieval Hindu empires and one of the greatest the world over, fostered the development of intellectual pursuits and fine arts. “The eye of the pupil has never seen a place like it and the ear of intelligence has never been informed that there existed anything to equal it in the world” is what Abdur Razaaq the Persian ambassador had to say about Krishnadevaraya’s time.

Tipu Sultan Tomb, Karnataka Travel AgentsThe Vijayanagara empire with its capital at Hampi fell a victim to the marauding army of the Deccan Sultan in 1565 A.D. As a consequence of this, Bijapur became the most important city of the region. This city is a land of monuments and perhaps no other city except Delhi has as many monuments as Bijapur. The Bahmani Shahis and the Adilshahis of Bijapur have played a notable part in the history of Karnataka by their contribution to the field of art and architecture and also by their propagation of Islam in the state.

Hyder Ali and his valiant son Tipu Sultan are notable figures in the history of the land. They expanded the Mysore kingdom on an unprecedented scale and by their resistance against the British, became personages of world fame. Tipu was a great scholar and lover of literature. His artistic pursuits were also many and he made rich gifts to the Hindu temples. Tipu Sultan “Tiger of Karnataka” was killed in 1799 A.D., and the Mysore throne was handed over to the Wodeyar’s. The whole of Karnataka came under the control of the British in the beginning of the 19th century. The new state was named as new Mysore and the Maharaja of Mysore was appointed Governor by Independent India. This unified state was renamed as Karnataka on November 1, 1973.

Temples of Karnataka
Temples of Karnataka

The State of Karnataka is known for its multitude of tourist attractions and temples. Pilgrimage centers such as Mookambika and Udupi cradled in the western ghats offer a contrast to the ruins of the once grand Vijayanagar edifices at Hampi. The Hoysala temples marked with a profusion of intricate sculpture, and the ancient temples built by the Cholas, and the Chalukyan temples add to the variation in style across this state.

About the Temples of Karnataka: The Chalukyas, the Gangas, the Hoysalas, the Vijayanagar rulers and others contributed to diverse temple styles seen in Karnataka. halei1.jpg (10672 bytes) Halebidua sculptors dream lived in stone. The Hoysaleswara temple in Halebidu is a masterpiece of Hoysala architecture and sculpture.
Mookambika – Kollur: Rich in legend and tradition, this temple at Kollur is closely associated with Adi Sankaracharya. Udupi - is the seat of the Madhva school of philosophy. The Balakrishna temple is one of the well visited pilgrimage centers of Karnataka. Gokarna: This ancient Shiva temple is revered pilgrimage center in Karnataka ; it has been revered by the hymns of the ancient Tamil saints.
Sravanabelagola: The collossal monolithic image of Gomateswara or Bahubali is a familiar sight to those touring Karnataka. gomates3.jpg (10635 bytes) Nandi hills, located near Bangalore is home to the Bhoganandeeswara and Yoganandeeswara temples.
Belur Chennakesava Temple: Explore the rich sculptural wealth of this ancient Hoysala monument built by Vishnuvardhana of the 12th century CE. (article contributed by guest writer).) Somnathpura: The Kesava temple at Somnathapura located near Mysore is a standing illustration of Hoysala art. Belur Chennakesava Temple: Explore the history of this Hoysala monument and experience its sculptural splendour. (article contributed by guest writer).
Srirangapatna near Mysore - the historic capital of Tipu Sultan enshrines Ranganatha and Ranganayaki at the grand Ranganatha temple. Melkote located near Mysore is home to the Tirunarayana temple and is a seat of the Sri Vaishnava tradition. Chamundeswari Temple built at Chamundi hills near Mysore enshrines Chamundeswari the tutelary deity of the Maharajahs of Mysore.
Aihole near Bijapur is one of the centers of early Chalukyan art. The Durga temple is probably the best known of the temples here. patadakl.jpg (19890 bytes) Badami: The ancient town of Vatapi was a capital of the early Chalukyas. It is now known as Badami and it has several temples from the sixth and seventh centuries CE.
Pattadakal, the third in the triad of early Chalukyan art centers near Bijapur has several landmarks in the evolution of temple architecture. Mahakoota is another early Chalukyan temple art repository and is located near Badami. Talakkad near Mysore: This ancient temple at Talakkad near Mysore was patronized by the Cholas of the 12th century CE.
The Virupaksha temple at Vijayanagar dating back to the period of Krishna Deva Raya, enshrines Virupaksha or Pampapati. hampi2.jpg (8469 bytes) The Vitthala temple at Vijayanagar (Hampi) is known for its halls with exquisite pillars, intricate friezes and the a stone chariot.
Subrahmanya is one of the seven revered Mukti stalas of Karnataka and it enshrines Subrahmanya (Kartikeya). The Seven Mukti Stalas of Karnataka associated with Parasurama include some of the well visited pilgrimage shrines such as Kollur, Udupi & Gokarna. Dharmastala – a well visited pilgrimage center in Karnataka enshrines Manjunatha, in this stala of Dharma or righteousness & charity.
Nanjangud: The Shrikanteshwara temple at Nanjangud near Mysore is a revered center of worship. The Kalyani Chalukyas of the 11th & 12th centuries developed a temple style characterized by ornate pillars and doorways. The district of Kolar known more for its gold fields is home to several temples tracing their history through several royal dynasties that ruled the region.
     
Sringeri: The Vidyashankara temple is a magnificient temple built under the patronage of the Vijayanagar empire. sringeri.jpg (23828 bytes) Karnataka Temple Index: This index provides a pointer to the hundreds of temples that dot the state of Karnataka.

History of Karnataka

Hoysaleshwara Temple, Karnataka TourismChandragupta Maurya, the great Indian emperor abdicated the throne and embraced Jainism at Shravanabelagola. Adding new dimensions to the cultural and spiritual ethos of the land, many great dynasties left their imprint upon the aesthetic development of Karnataka’s art forms. Prominent among them were the Chalukyas, the Hoysalas and the mighty Vijayanagara Empire. The Chalukyan’s built some of the very early Hindu temples in India. Aihole turned up as an experimental base for the dynamic creations of architects. The Hoysala’s who ruled from the 11th to the 13th century chiseled their way into the pages of glory by building more than 150 temples, each one is a master piece in its own way.

Karnataka, called as Karunadu (elevated land) in ancient times. The course of Karnataka’s history and culture takes us back to pre-historic times. The earliest find of the stone age period in India was a hand axe at Lingasugur in Raichur district. The Ashoka’s rock edicts found in the state indicate that major parts of Northern Karnataka were under the Mauryas.

Hyder Ali and his valiant son Tipu Sultan are notable figures in the history of the land. They expanded the Mysore kingdom on an unprecedented scale and by their resistance against the British, became personages of world fame. Tipu was a great scholar and lover of literature. His artistic pursuits were also many and he made rich gifts to the Hindu temples. Tipu Sultan “Tiger of Karnataka” was killed in 1799 A.D., and the Mysore throne was handed over to the Wodeyar’s. The whole of Karnataka came under the control of the British in the beginning of the 19th century. The new state was named as new Mysore and the Maharaja of Mysore was appointed Bidar Fort, Karnataka TourismGovernor by Independent India. This unified state was renamed as Karnataka on November 1, 1973.

The Vijayanagara empire with its capital at Hampi fell a victim to the marauding army of the Deccan Sultan in 1565 A.D. As a consequence of this, Bijapur became the most important city of the region. This city is a land of monuments and perhaps no other city except Delhi has as many monuments as Bijapur. The Bahmani Shahis and the Adilshahis of Bijapur have played a notable part in the history of Karnataka by their contribution to the field of art and architecture and also by their propagation of Islam in the state.

The amazing dexterity and fluidity of expressions at Somnathpur, Halebid and Belur open themselves to the wide eyed wonder in one’s eyes. Vijayanagara, the greatest of all medieval Hindu empires and one of the greatest the world over, fostered the development of intellectual pursuits and fine arts. “The eye of the pupil has never seen a place like it and the ear of intelligence has never been informed that there existed anything to equal it in the world” is what Abdur Razaaq the Persian ambassador had to say about Krishnadevaraya’s time.

History of Karnataka

In ancient times, Karnataka was called Karunadu, literally meaning elevated land.

¤ The Early Karnataka

The evidence of Maurayan dynasty in Karnataka is the Ashoka’s rock edicts found in the state. The great Chandragupta Maurya ruled the state and adopted Jainism at Shravanabelagola. After him many other dynasties like the Chalukyas, the Hoysalas and the Vijayanagars ruled it. These dynasties added value to the cultural and spiritual value of the state.

karnatakaAt Aihole in Karanataka, the Chalukyas constructed the early Hindu temples in India. These temples are regarded as the architectural wonders. Similarly, the Hoysala’s who ruled from the 11th to the 13th century, built more than 150 temples having excellent architecture.

¤ Karnataka Under Vijayanagar Empire

The most celebrated dynasty that ruled Karnataka is the Vijayanagar dynasty. The Vijyanagar kings were the greatest of all medieval Hindu empires and were lovers of fine arts. They have contributed a lot to the culture and traditions of the state. Many foreign visitors who came to this place during this period have described it as one of the most prosperous states.

¤ The Fall of Vijayanagar Empire

The grand Vijayanagar dynasty disintegrated with its capital at Hampi after the attack of the Deccan Sultan in 1565 A.D. Therefore, Bijapur was established as the capital and many monuments were build around the city. It was ruled by the Bahmani Shahis and the Adilshahis, who have contributed a lot to the architecture, art and the spread of Islam in the state.

¤ The Muslim Domination and The British Control

Later, the state was ruled by Hyder Ali and his brave son Tipu Sultan. They were responsible for the expansion of the Mysore kingdom. Tipu was a great scholar and lover of literature. He was a good administrator and offered expensive gifts to the Hindu temples. Tipu Sultan was also known as “Tiger of Karnataka”, since he fought bravely with the British and never allowed them to overpower Mysore . He was killed in 1799 A.D. and thus the throne of Mysore went into the hands of Wodeyar’s. In the beginning of the 19th century, entire Karnataka came under the control of the British.

¤ Karnataka Post-Independence

After India’s Independence, the state of Mysore was governed by the Maharaja of Mysore, who was appointed by Independent India. But later, on November 1, 1973, the integrated state was renamed as Karnataka.

 

 

History of Karnataka

Karnataka TourismKarnataka, called as Karunadu (elevated land) in ancient times. The course of Karnataka’s history and culture takes us back to pre-historic times. The earliest find of the stone age period in India was a hand axe at Lingasugur in Raichur district. The Ashoka’s rock edicts found in the state indicate that major parts of Northern Karnataka were under the Mauryas.

Chandragupta Maurya, the great Indian emperor abdicated the throne and embraced Jainism at Shravanabelagola. Adding new dimensions to the cultural and spiritual ethos of the land, many great dynasties left their imprint upon the aesthetic development of Karnataka’s art forms.

Prominent among them were the Chalukyas, the Hoysalas and the mighty Vijayanagara Empire. The Chalukyan’s built some of the very early Hindu temples in India. Aihole turned up as an experimental base for the dynamic creations of architects. The Hoysala’s who ruled from the 11th to the 13th century chiseled their way into the pages of glory by building more than 150 temples, each one is a master piece in its own way.

The amazing dexterity and fluidity of expressions at Somnathpur, Halebid and Belur open themselves to the wide eyed wonder in one’s eyes. Vijayanagara, the greatest of all medieval Hindu empires and one of the greatest the world over, fostered the development of intellectual pursuits and fine arts.

“The eye of the pupil has never seen a place like it and the ear of intelligence has never been informed that there existed anything to equal it in the world” is what Abdur Razaaq the Persian ambassador had to say about Krishnadevaraya’s time.

Karnataka Travel GuideThe Vijayanagara empire with its capital at Hampi fell a victim to the marauding army of the Deccan Sultan in 1565 A.D. As a consequence of this, Bijapur became the most important city of the region. This city is a land of monuments and perhaps no other city except Delhi has as many monuments as Bijapur.

The Bahmani Shahis and the Adilshahis of Bijapur have played a notable part in the history of Karnataka by their contribution to the field of art and architecture and also by their propagation of Islam in the state.

Hyder Ali and his valiant son Tipu Sultan are notable figures in the history of the land. They expanded the Mysore kingdom on an unprecedented scale and by their resistance against the British, became personages of world fame.

Tipu was a great scholar and lover of literature. His artistic pursuits were also many and he made rich gifts to the Hindu temples. Tipu Sultan “Tiger of Karnataka” was killed in 1799 A.D., and the Mysore throne was handed over to the Wodeyar’s.

The whole of Karnataka came under the control of the British in the beginning of the 19th century. The new state was named as new Mysore and the Maharaja of Mysore was appointed Governor by Independent India. This unified state was renamed as Karnataka on November 1, 1973.

 

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July 27, 2007 - Posted by | EKAVI COORG-KODAGU, History of Karnataka

3 Comments »

  1. congratulations for depicting the vital info in an interesting style.
    is there anything in kannada language?

    Comment by divakar | October 12, 2011 | Reply

  2. write in kannada only i love kannada

    Comment by ayesha | September 5, 2013 | Reply

  3. I LOVE KARNATAKA,KANNADA,KANNADIGAS.

    Comment by monalisa | November 1, 2013 | Reply


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